3 Things You Learn After Adding Chat to Your Website

I work for a large nonprofit that recently added a Chat feature to its website. In the past, clients in need of information that wasn’t on the website had no choice but to call. Our Marketing Director saw a need for a more modern way for our clients to reach out to us. Here are some insights I’ve gained from the first few weeks of Chat:

1) Don’t call it “Chat.” There’s something that sounds very professional about saying, “I’m on the phone.” If used correctly, it can send people quietly scurrying away with whispers of “Oops! Sorry.”
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However, “I’m on Chat,” doesn’t carry the same connotation. It sounds frivolous.
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Stick with, “I’m helping a client navigate our services.”

2) People get impatient.giphy
You can buy yourself some time with strategic responses. My agency uses LiveChat, which allows users to create shortcuts for “canned responses”; for instance, typing “#please” generates the response, “Please give me a moment to check on that for you.”

3) Those hesitant to call will use Chat.
Adding a Chat feature can attract questions that people might have been nervous about asking over the phone. Chat puts people at ease.

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